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Meet Your Military: Marine Saves Scuba Diver in Okinawa

Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Scott Michael Dahn and Ching-Yi Sze pose for a photo in Okinawa, Japan, May 24, 2018. Dahn rescued Ching-Yi while she was scuba diving at Okinawa’s Maeda Point, May 20, 2018. Photo by Cpl. Andrew NeumannMarine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Scott Michael Dahn and Ching-Yi Sze pose for a photo in Okinawa, Japan, May 24, 2018. Dahn rescued Ching-Yi while she was scuba diving at Okinawa’s Maeda Point, May 20, 2018. Photo by Cpl. Andrew Neumann

OKINAWA, Japan -- By Cpl. Andrew Neumann
An expert Marine Corps diver came to the rescue of a Hong Kong woman who was scuba diving on her honeymoon here, May 20. Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Scott Dahn was practicing rescue diving at Maeda Point when he saw the woman, Ching-Yi Sze, start to panic.

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For Memorial Day 2018

Floyd D. Cheatham, Jr., from Deland, Florida, killed in action January 13, 1945 in the Battle of the BulgeFloyd D. Cheatham, Jr., from Deland, Florida, killed in action January 13, 1945 in the Battle of the BulgeIt is the American Soldier,
not the preacher,
who has given us freedom of religion.

It is the American Soldier,
not the reporter,
who has given us freedom of the press.

It is the American Soldier,
not the poet or professor,
who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the American Soldier,
not the campus organizer,
who has given us freedom to assemble.

It is the American Soldier,
not the lawyer,
who has given us the right to a fair trial.

It is the American Soldier,
not the politician,
Who has given us the right to vote.

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Meet Your Military: Airman Draws Inspiration From Vietnam Veteran

Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael Thompson, an electronic systems mechanic serving with the West Virginia Air National Guard’s 167th Airlift Wing poses for a photo in Martinsburg, W.Va., May 3, 2018. A Vietnam veteran helped Thompson’s family and inspired him to join the military. Air Force photo by Senior Master Sgt. Emily Beightol-DeyerleAir Force Tech. Sgt. Michael Thompson, an electronic systems mechanic serving with the West Virginia Air National Guard’s 167th Airlift Wing poses for a photo in Martinsburg, W.Va., May 3, 2018. A Vietnam veteran helped Thompson’s family and inspired him to join the military.
Photo by Senior Master Sgt. Emily Beightol-Deyerle

MARTINSBURG, W. Va -- By Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Emily Beightol-Deyerle

Forty-three years ago, as the North Vietnamese Army and the Viet Cong took over the South Vietnam capital city of Saigon, thousands of refugees fled their home country and the communist government.

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Meet Your Military: Virginia Tech Grads Serve Together as F-35 Pilots

Left to right: Marine Corps aviators Capt. Evan Slusser, Maj. John Stuart and Capt. Andrew Thornberg pose for a photo aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp in the Pacific Ocean, March 15, 2018. The trio are F-35B Lightning II pilots with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121, embarked aboard the USS Wasp. All three Marines graduated from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, also known as Virginia Tech, in Blacksburg, Va. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bernadette WildesLeft to right: Marine Corps aviators Capt. Evan Slusser, Maj. John Stuart and Capt. Andrew Thornberg pose for a photo aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp in the Pacific Ocean, March 15, 2018. The trio are F-35B Lightning II pilots with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121, embarked aboard the USS Wasp. All three Marines graduated from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, also known as Virginia Tech, in Blacksburg, Va.
photo by Cpl. Bernadette Wildes

PACIFIC OCEAN -- April 23, 2018 - by Cpl. Bernadette Wildes
Three Virginia Tech alumni are now serving as Marine Corps aviators.
Marine Corps Maj. John Stuart, Capt. Evan Slusser and Capt. Andrew Thornberg fly the F-35B Lightning II out of Iwakuni, Japan, with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121.

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Meet Your Military: Marine Leads Surveillance Sensor Ops

Marine Corps Sgt. John Verhage III, a native of South Brunswick, N.J., is a surveillance sensor operator with Task Force Southwest in Afghanistan, March 12, 2018. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Sean J. BerryMarine Corps Sgt. John Verhage III, a native of South Brunswick, N.J., is a surveillance sensor operator with Task Force Southwest in Afghanistan, March 12, 2018. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Sean J. Berry

LASHKAR GAH, Afghanistan, April 10, 2018 — by Sgt. Sean J. Berry
“I’d rather take lessons from the past than learn lessons the hard way,” said Marine Corps Sgt. John Verhage III, who hails from South Brunswick, New Jersey, and is a surveillance sensor operator with Task Force Southwest here. 

“It’s better to use something like ground sensors now, rather than something happening and wishing we would have employed measures like this beforehand,” Verhage said.

Verhage leads the ground sensor operations in Helmand province, which helps employ remote sensors as general surveillance and early warning systems to aid the Afghan National Defense and security forces.

Supporting Afghan Forces

The constant management of the remote sensors systems helps Afghan forces maintain a high level of awareness during combat operations.

“We’re all working together here; we’re protecting ourselves and the [Afghan National Police] at the same time with these sensors,” said Verhage, who has logged numerous security patrols — both mounted and dismounted — to help boost the Afghan’s defense capabilities through sensor emplacement.

“If I do my job, the police feel safer, which in turn makes us all feel safer,” he said. “Every life matters out here, and I’m just doing my part.”

Providing Warning of Enemy Activity

The ability to detect enemy activity through remote surveillance is nothing new. The Marines’ sensor control and management platoons employed unmanned remote sensor systems since 1967 during the Vietnam War.

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